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Getting good UK immigration advice?

Getting good UK immigration advice? I think it's an important topic to discuss and understand. We know, and we are sorry to hear those who have lost loved ones or perhaps, have lost their employment or income. Covid-19 has been something no one had planned but we have to think ahead. Getting good UK immigration advice is important, it is not simple enough to understand that we know which application to choose, or submit with evidences, we need to know whether that application is right for me or my family members. Even lodging an application correctly, will require you to submit all the right evidences and avoid an immigration application being refused. I see, most people, looking at those who advise and using words such as experts and specialist, we would like to think at ICS Legal, we are. We have been dealing with UK immigration matters for the last 15 years. We have advised both private and business clients, on immigration matters and have built a strong reputation. We see our UK immigration advice is a key element to who we are. We charge service costs, as we value our legal advice. We know our advice will help you,...

Adult Dependent Relatives Visas

Adult Dependent Relatives Visas The adult dependent relative (ADR) is an application route to bring dependant family members to the UK. The immigration policy since July 2012 have changed drastically. The policy intention behind the ADR Rules is, firstly, to reduce the burden on the taxpayer for the provision of NHS and local authority social care services to ADRs whose needs can reasonably and adequately be met in their home country; and, secondly, to ensure that those ADRs whose needs can only be reasonably and adequately met in the UK are granted immediate settled status (where their sponsor has this or is a British Citizen) and full access to the NHS and local authority social care services. This is intended to avoid creating a disparity between ADRs depending on their wealth and that of their sponsor, and to give those ADRs who qualify certainty about their long-term status in the UK. The application must establish that the applicant has no access to the required level of care in the country where they are living, even with the practical and financial help of the sponsor in the UK. This could be because it is not available and there is no person in that...

Adopted children and children coming to the UK for adoption

Applications for a UK visa on a child, who have been adopted, can apply on the following basis: the adopted child of a parent or parents present and settled in the UK or being admitted for settlement in the UK; the adopted child of a parent or parents given limited leave to enter or remain in the UK; a child for adoption; or a child for adoption under the Hague Convention. The duty in section 55 of the Borders, Citizenship and Immigration Act 2009 to have regard to the need to safeguard and promote the welfare of a child in the UK, together with Article 3 of the UN Convention on the Rights of the Child, means that consideration of the child’s best interests must be a primary consideration in immigration decisions affecting them. This guidance and the Immigration Rules it covers form part of the arrangements for ensuring that we give practical effect to these obligations. You must carefully consider all of the information and evidence provided in the application concerning the best interests of a relevant child (that is a person who is under the age of 18 years at the date of application and it is evident from the information provided by...

No recourse to public funds applications to change conditions of leave: July 2020

No recourse to public funds applications to change conditions of leave: July 2020 No Recourse To Public Funds (NRPF) is a standard condition applied to those in the UK with a temporary immigration status in order to protect public funds. Most migrants visiting, studying, working or joining family in the UK are subject to an NRPF condition until they have obtained indefinite leave to remain. Migrants here without leave are also subject to NRPF, by virtue of their being in the UK without status. Exceptions are made in respect of some migrants, such as families here on the basis of family life/Article 8, where the condition is lifted if the family can provide evidence that they would otherwise be destitute. Migrants with leave under the family and human rights routes can apply to have the NRPF restriction lifted by making a ‘change of conditions’ application if there has been a change in their financial circumstances. The figures included in this ad-hoc release relate to these change of conditions applications, and subsequent decisions. These figures do not directly relate to people, but rather individual claims and their outcomes. More than one claim can be made during a grant of leave and subsequent...

Statement of Changes to be considered – post Aug 2020

Hi, we hope that you will find the following information useful in respect to the new changes to the immigration policies: Some changes are being made to the Immigration Rules for the EU Settlement Scheme (EUSS), contained in Appendix EU, and for the EUSS family permit and travel permit, contained in Appendix EU (Family Permit). The EUSS enables EU, other European Economic Area (EEA) and Swiss citizens living in the UK (and referred to collectively here as ‘EEA citizens’), and their family members, to obtain the UK immigration status they need to remain in the UK, with the same rights to work, study and access benefits and services as they had before the UK left the EU. The EUSS family permit and travel permit enable certain non-EEA citizen family members of a resident EEA citizen to travel to the UK. To extend the scope for victims of domestic violence or abuse to apply for status under the EUSS. In line with the Withdrawal Agreement and the Free Movement Directive, this is currently limited to a former spouse or civil partner whose marriage or civil partnership has been legally terminated and who was a victim of domestic violence or abuse while the marriage...

Coronavirus (COVID-19): advice for UK visa applicants and temporary UK residents

Coronavirus (COVID-19): advice for UK visa applicants and temporary UK residents This is advice for visa customers and applicants in the UK, visa customers outside of the UK and British nationals overseas who need to apply for a passport affected by travel restrictions associated with coronavirus. You can speak to our dedicated Client Support Team on 0207 237 3388 about your legal status in the UK.  Here are some important elements to consider post the temp concession policies: The Home Office only permitting a period of leave until 31st August 2020 and you must then depart from the UK. There are struct policies and you must adhere to those. Leaving the UK is important, as overstaying in the UK can result in a ban. Whilst you have been allowed to stay during the temporary measures, you must leave the UK now. Those who are on long term visas or residency permits, do not benefit from these provisions. This can cause breaks in your residency also referred as lawful residency. This was a temporary measure in place, to avoid those who were leaving the UK, to stay here until it was safe to return. If you decide to stay in the...