Asylum claims and the Dublin regulations - ICS Legal Blog

Contact Us: + 44 0207 237 3388

Latest UK & International Legal News

Asylum claims and the Dublin regulations

Asylum claims and the Dublin regulations

The Dublin procedure:

  • guarantees that your application for asylum reaches the authority of the country responsible for examining it
  • ensures you don’t make many applications for asylum in several countries to extend your stay in Dublin countries

The Dublin procedure covers 32 countries. The ‘Dublin countries’ are:

  • Austria
  • Belgium
  • Bulgaria
  • Croatia
  • Cyprus
  • Czech Republic
  • Denmark
  • Estonia
  • Finland
  • France
  • Germany
  • Greece
  • Hungary
  • Ireland
  • Italy
  • Latvia
  • Lithuania
  • Luxembourg
  • Malta
  • Netherlands
  • Poland
  • Portugal
  • Romania
  • Slovakia
  • Slovenia
  • Spain
  • Sweden
  • UK

As well as the 4 countries ‘associated’ with the Dublin system:

  • Norway
  • Iceland
  • Switzerland
  • Liechtenstein

The Dublin procedure finds out which country will examine your application for asylum. This means you may be transferred from the UK to a different country that is responsible for your application. Until we decide which country is responsible for deciding on your application, we won’t consider your application.

The Dublin procedure establishes which single country is responsible for examining your application for asylum. This means you may be transferred from this country to a different country that is responsible for examining your application. The Dublin procedure has two purposes: • to guarantee that your application for asylum will reach the authority of the country responsible for examining it; • to ensure that you do not make multiple applications for asylum in several countries with the aim of extending your stay in the Dublin countries. Until it has been decided which country is responsible for deciding on your application, the authorities here will not consider the detail of your application.

We will determine which country is responsible through a process established by a European Union law known as the ‘Dublin’ Regulation. This process is called the ‘Dublin procedure’.