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Apply for a UK visa in Australia

Apply for a UK visa in Australia Visa service closures in December 2016 and January 2017 UK Visas and Immigration will offer a reduced service from 23 December 2016 to 2 January 2017. You should allow additional time for the processing of your visa application during this period. All offices will be open as normal from 3 January 2017. Some visa application centres may remain open during this period, however the Canberra and Manila priority processing offices will be closed from 24 to 28 December 2016 and on 2 January 2017. No 5 working day priority service applications will be processed during these periods. Australia Post often experiences delays during December, so you should apply for your visa as early as possible. Priority visa service If you submit your application and use the 5 working day priority service (non-settlement cases) after 14 December 2016, you may not receive your decision until we re-open after the holiday period. We do not guarantee a 5 working day turnaround, however we do aim to process most priority applications within that time. If you submit your application and use the 10 working day priority service (settlement applications only) after 7 December 2016, you may...

Changes to reform the periods within which applications for further leave can be made by overstayers

Changes to reform the periods within which applications for further leave can be made by overstayers While applications for further leave to remain for many rules-based applications are expected to be made in time, i.e. before any existing leave expires, any period of overstaying for 28 days or less is not a ground for refusal as far as those applications are concerned. This 28 day period was originally brought in so that people who had made an innocent mistake were not penalised, but retaining it sends a message which is inconsistent with the need to ensure compliance with the United Kingdom‟s immigration laws. The 28-day period is therefore to be abolished. However, an out of time application will not be refused on the basis that the applicant has overstayed where the Secretary of State considers that there is a good reason beyond the control of the applicant or their representative, given in or with the application, why an in time application could not be made, provided the application is made within 14 days of the expiry of leave. Additionally, for those who have been present on 3C leave (leave extended by section 3C of the Immigration Act 1971), the 28-day...

Changes relating to Family and Private Life

Changes relating to Family and Private Life The following changes and clarifications are being made to the Immigration Rules relating to family and private life: Include in the transitional provisions in paragraphs A277B and A227C of Part 8 of the Immigration Rules access to the provisions of the child rules under Appendix FM. Confirm that a letter confirming the issuing of a Certificate of Eligibility to adopt is required when an entry clearance application involves an intercountry adoption subject to section 83 of the Adoption and Children Act 2002 or the equivalent legislation in Scotland or Northern Ireland. Clarify when those who have made false representations or failed to disclose any material fact in a previous application will normally be refused on grounds of suitability. Reduce the level of NHS debt from £1000 to £500 as a discretionary basis for refusal on grounds of suitability. Introduce from 1 May 2017 a new English language requirement at level A2 of the Common European Framework of Reference for Languages for applicants for further leave in the UK as a partner or parent, after completing 30 months here on a 5-year route to settlement under Appendix FM. Clarify that a child is only...

Changes relating to administrative review

Changes relating to administrative review  Appendix AR to the Immigration Rules sets out the Rules for administrative review including the decisions that are eligible for review. The purpose of an administrative review is to assess whether the original decision maker made a case working error in deciding the application. The review is ordinarily based on the evidence originally supplied with the application. Additional evidence may only be submitted in the circumstances set out in paragraph AR2.4 of Appendix AR, with reference to certain sub-paragraphs of AR2.11. Two minor amendments have been made to these Rules. Firstly, a change has been made to paragraph AR2.4 to clarify that the reviewer may consider evidence that was not before the original decision maker where either sub-paragraph (a) or (b) applies. There is no need for both subparagraphs to apply. This was always the policy intention and the Rule has in practice been interpreted in this way. Secondly, a change has been made to remove the reference to paragraph V.9.2 in paragraph AR2.11(a)(iii). Where a person arrives in the UK with leave to enter or remain (including a visit visa) this can be cancelled at the border on grounds which include a change of...

Changes relating to overseas domestic workers

Changes relating to overseas domestic workers The Immigration Rules are amended to: Remove the upper age limit currently applied to those applying in the Overseas Domestic Worker in Private Household category. Clarify the meaning of full-time employment in the context of extension applications made in respect of those admitted in the Overseas Domestic Worker in Private Household category where they were admitted under the Rules in force prior to April 2012. Provide for those admitted as an overseas domestic worker to qualify for a grant of leave as a domestic worker who is the victim of slavery or human trafficking where they have been granted discretionary leave immediately following a positive conclusive grounds decision under the National Referral Mechanism. Amend the conditions of stay applied to a person granted leave to enter or remain as a Tier 5 (Temporary Worker) where they are a private servant in a diplomatic household. Safe third country and first country of asylum concepts EU law, as set out in the Procedures Directive (2005/85/EC), supports the principles and allows for applications for asylum to be treated as inadmissible where the applicant could safely be returned to a non-EU state that can be considered either a...

Changes relating to Tier 5 of the Points-Based System

Changes relating to Tier 5 of the Points-Based System Tier 5 of the Points-Based System encompasses the Tier 5 (Youth Mobility Scheme) and Tier 5 (Temporary Worker) categories. The following changes are being made in Tier 5: The Immigration Rules are amended to specify new allocations of places to participating countries for 2017 in the Tier 5 (Youth Mobility Scheme) category. The allocations are based on previous levels of take up by British citizens of equivalent schemes offered by participating countries. The Rules are amended to provide for the operation of arrangements to manage the allocation of places under the Tier 5 (Youth Mobility Scheme) allocation for Japan, where demand is expected to significantly exceed supply. Deemed sponsorship status is conferred upon Taiwan. The provisions of the Immigration Rules in respect of maintenance requirements are amended to bring them in line with the equivalent provisions for Tier 2 migrants, providing A-Rated Tier 5 sponsors with the option of certifying maintenance in respect of a Tier 5 migrant by confirming that that they will maintain and accommodate the migrant for the first month of their stay. The rules are also amended to enable a Tier 5 sponsor to certify maintenance in...

Changes relating to English language requirements for Points-Based System applicants

Changes relating to English language requirements for Points-Based System applicants A change is being made to Appendix B to be clear that an applicant must provide official documentation produced by UK NARIC to confirm any assessment of their degree by UK NARIC. Changes relating to the Department for International Trade in the requirements for Points-Based System applicants Changes are being made to references to UK Trade and Investment (UKTI), to reflect that UKTI is now a part of the Department for International Trade, and that funding for its global graduate entrepreneur programme is now provided by an external supplier. Changes relating to Tier 4 of the Points-Based System Tier 4 of the Points-Based System is the visa route used by non-EEA students wishing to study in the UK. Tier 4 is comprised of two categories: Tier 4 (General) and Tier 4 (Child). The following changes are being made in Tier 4: A minor change is being made to the definition of a UK Recognised Body to reflect a change in ownership of the Tier 4 Postgraduate Doctor and Dentist Page 10 of 16 Programme from the UK Foundation Programme Office to Health Education South London, and from 1 November 2016...

Changes relating to Tier 2 of the Points-Based System

Changes relating to Tier 2 of the Points-Based System Tier 2 of the Points-Based System caters for migrant workers with an offer of a skilled job from a licensed employer. There are four overall categories: General, Intra-Company Transfer (ICT), Minister of Religion, and Sportsperson. The Government announced changes to Tier 2 (General) and Tier 2 (ICT) on 24 March 2016 following a review published by the independent Migration Advisory Committee (MAC) on 19 January 2016. The Government announced that the changes would be introduced in two stages, in autumn 2016 and April 2017. This Statement includes the changes announced for autumn 2016, and additional minor changes. The changes to each specific category are set out below. In addition, the time given to applicants and sponsors to respond to requests for further information in relation to genuineness assessments in both categories is being reduced from 28 calendar days to 10 working days, for consistency with other similar requirements elsewhere in the Immigration Rules. Minor changes are also being made across both these categories to clarify appropriate rate requirements and replace outdated references to the UK Border Agency. Tier 2 (General) The Tier 2 (General) category is for migrant workers with an...

Changes relating to Tier 1 of the Points-Based System

Changes relating to Tier 1 of the Points-Based System Tier 1 of the Points-Based System caters for high value migrants, and currently consists of four active categories: Tier 1 (Exceptional Talent), Tier 1 (Entrepreneur), Tier 1 (Investor) and Tier 1 (Graduate Entrepreneur). It also includes the Tier 1 (General) category, which was closed to new applicants in April 2011 but remains open for settlement applications. Tier 1 (Entrepreneur) The Tier 1 (Entrepreneur) category caters for applicants coming to the UK to set up, take over, or be involved in the running of a business in the UK. The following minor technical changes are being made to this category to clarify various evidential requirements and to correct minor drafting errors: An amendment to clarify that applicants supplying third party evidence do not need to meet the requirement for their bank statements to cover a consecutive 90-day period of time. An amendment to make clear that applicants who are also accountants cannot sign-off their own accounts and/or funding evidence. Making a provision to allow applicants with funding from an endorsed Seed Funding Competition to provide a letter from an authorised official of the fund as confirmation that money is being made available...

Changes relating to the Points-Based System

Points-Based System applications are normally decided on the basis of the information provided by the applicant before the case is considered. Paragraph 245AA of the Immigration Rules sets out the limited circumstances in which a decision maker may write out to request further evidence from the applicant. A change has been made to clarify in what circumstances a document will be considered to be missing from a sequence for the purposes of paragraph 245AA(b)(i) and so may be requested from the applicant. A document will only be considered to be missing from a sequence where the documents at the beginning and the end of a sequence have both been provided and the missing document is within that sequence. When further documents have been requested under evidential flexibility, the time period the applicant has to provide the required document has been changed from 7 working days to 10 working days. This is to align it with the time period for responding to a request made under the current paragraph 34C (paragraph 34B from 24 November 2016) of the Immigration Rules.