Immigration Detention & Bail Archives - Page 7 of 17 - ICS Legal Blog

Contact Us: + 44 0207 237 3388

Latest UK & International Legal News

Apply for a UK visa in Australia

Apply for a UK visa in Australia Visa service closures in December 2016 and January 2017 UK Visas and Immigration will offer a reduced service from 23 December 2016 to 2 January 2017. You should allow additional time for the processing of your visa application during this period. All offices will be open as normal from 3 January 2017. Some visa application centres may remain open during this period, however the Canberra and Manila priority processing offices will be closed from 24 to 28 December 2016 and on 2 January 2017. No 5 working day priority service applications will be processed during these periods. Australia Post often experiences delays during December, so you should apply for your visa as early as possible. Priority visa service If you submit your application and use the 5 working day priority service (non-settlement cases) after 14 December 2016, you may not receive your decision until we re-open after the holiday period. We do not guarantee a 5 working day turnaround, however we do aim to process most priority applications within that time. If you submit your application and use the 10 working day priority service (settlement applications only) after 7 December 2016, you may...

Changes relating to English language requirements for Points-Based System applicants

Changes relating to English language requirements for Points-Based System applicants A change is being made to Appendix B to be clear that an applicant must provide official documentation produced by UK NARIC to confirm any assessment of their degree by UK NARIC. Changes relating to the Department for International Trade in the requirements for Points-Based System applicants Changes are being made to references to UK Trade and Investment (UKTI), to reflect that UKTI is now a part of the Department for International Trade, and that funding for its global graduate entrepreneur programme is now provided by an external supplier. Changes relating to Tier 4 of the Points-Based System Tier 4 of the Points-Based System is the visa route used by non-EEA students wishing to study in the UK. Tier 4 is comprised of two categories: Tier 4 (General) and Tier 4 (Child). The following changes are being made in Tier 4: A minor change is being made to the definition of a UK Recognised Body to reflect a change in ownership of the Tier 4 Postgraduate Doctor and Dentist Page 10 of 16 Programme from the UK Foundation Programme Office to Health Education South London, and from 1 November 2016...

Changes relating to Tier 2 of the Points-Based System

Changes relating to Tier 2 of the Points-Based System Tier 2 of the Points-Based System caters for migrant workers with an offer of a skilled job from a licensed employer. There are four overall categories: General, Intra-Company Transfer (ICT), Minister of Religion, and Sportsperson. The Government announced changes to Tier 2 (General) and Tier 2 (ICT) on 24 March 2016 following a review published by the independent Migration Advisory Committee (MAC) on 19 January 2016. The Government announced that the changes would be introduced in two stages, in autumn 2016 and April 2017. This Statement includes the changes announced for autumn 2016, and additional minor changes. The changes to each specific category are set out below. In addition, the time given to applicants and sponsors to respond to requests for further information in relation to genuineness assessments in both categories is being reduced from 28 calendar days to 10 working days, for consistency with other similar requirements elsewhere in the Immigration Rules. Minor changes are also being made across both these categories to clarify appropriate rate requirements and replace outdated references to the UK Border Agency. Tier 2 (General) The Tier 2 (General) category is for migrant workers with an...

European Economic Area administrative removal: consideration and decision

For the purposes of the Immigration (European Economic Area) Regulations 2006 (as amended) (‘the EEA Regulations’), an ‘EEA national’ is a national of a Member State of the European Union (EU) other than the UK, or a national of Iceland, Liechtenstein, Norway or Switzerland. EEA nationals have rights of free movement and residence within the EEA states, subject to certain limitations. Where an EEA national has a right to reside in the UK under the EEA Regulations, their direct family members (who may not themselves be EEA nationals) are afforded the same rights of free movement and residence. Extended family members of EEA nationals do not acquire a right of residence on the basis of their relationship to an EEA national unless they have been issued with the relevant documentation by the Home Office. The family members of an EEA national are defined in regulation 7 (direct family members) and regulation 8 (extended family members) of the 2006 Regulations. For additional guidance on investigating claims to be an EEA family member, please see the ‘Investigating claims by non-EEA nationals to be family members of EEA nationals’ section of sham marriage, civil partnerships and marriages of convenience. Initial right to reside:...

Article 1D of the Refugee Convention: Palestinian refugees assisted by the United Nations Relief and Works Agency (UNRWA)

As a result of the 1948 Arab-Israeli conflict, the establishment of the State of Israel, and the exodus of Palestinians into neighbouring countries, the United Nations Relief and Works Agency for Palestine Refugees in the Near East (UNRWA) was established to carry out direct relief and works programmes for Palestinian refugees in the neighbouring countries of Jordan, Lebanon and Syria. Article 1D is one of the exclusion clauses in the Refugee Convention, but its overall purpose is to ensure the continuing protection of Palestinian refugees until their position is settled in accordance with relevant United Nations General Assembly resolutions. For as long as they are receiving UNRWA protection, they are excluded from Convention refugee protection. Should that protection cease to be available, they become entitled to the protection of the Convention under Article 1D. UNRWA currently provides assistance and protection to some 5 million registered Palestinian refugees. The Agency’s services comprise private and public advocacy, education, health care, relief, camp infrastructure and improvement, community support, microfinance and emergency response, including in times of armed conflict. UNRWA does not administer the refugee camps, is not responsible for security or law and order in the camps, and has no police force or...

Apply for a UK visa in China

Apply for a UK Visitor visa in China You can apply for a UK visitor visa in China if you want a regular visitor to Britain for the following activities: Leisure and entertainment, such as vacation, visiting friends, or attending ADS tour Short-term business visits, such as meetings, workshops, training or the provision of training, participate in sports or creative activities, or short-term academic visits You can not: Fill vacancies gainful or unpaid work UK permanent residence in the United Kingdom through frequent Married or registered same-sex civil partnership, or give notice of marriage or civil partnership for same-sex The use of public funds Maximum stay The Standard visitor's visa is valid for six months, January 11, 2016, began to apply for a standard visitor visa in the Chinese mainland Chinese citizens are eligible for a 2-year valid visa. It requires a longer valid UK visa frequent visitors can also apply for a period of 5 years or 10 years in any line visa (long-term visa). Multiple-entry visas may be valid within the UK. Specify the destination travel plans (ADS) Visitors can stay up to 30 days in the UK. If you accept the UK private medical treatment, you can...

Litigation debt

Litigation debt is a debt owed to the Home Office where the court or Tribunal has ordered another party to pay our legal costs. Litigation debt can arise from all types of litigation, including appeals, judicial reviews and private law claims such as unlawful detention. You must always check whether an applicant owes a litigation debt. This guidance does not apply to: protection claims (this means decisions on asylum and humanitarian protection claims as well as on protection-based claims under article 3 of the European Convention on Human Rights(ECHR)) European Economic Area (EEA) nationals and their family members who apply under the EEA regulations nationality Litigation debt in the Immigration Rules. A power to refuse applications for entry clearance, leave to enter or leave to remain on the basis of litigation debt was added to the Immigration Rules and applies to applications made on or after 6 April 2016. You must not apply this rule to any applications made before 6 April 2016. You must take account of all litigation debts, including those accrued before 6 April 2016, when considering an application made on or after 6 April. Considering refusal Once you have confirmed that the litigation debt is still...

Unaccompanied minors arrive in UK ahead of Calais camp clearance

The first group of unaccompanied children have arrived in the UK from Calais today (17 October), following the Home Secretary’s pledge to transfer as many minors as possible before the camp is cleared. The group, aged 14 to 17, were transported across the Channel this morning. They will be screened and processed by the Home Office, before being reunited with their families in the coming days. More children are due to arrive from France over the next few days and weeks under the Dublin regulation mechanism. Separately, Home Office officials are working with French authorities, NGOs and charities to identify children who are eligible under the ‘Dubs amendment’ of the Immigration Act. A Home Office spokesperson said: We can confirm a group of children who left the Calais camp this morning have arrived in the UK. This is the start of the process to transfer as many eligible children as possible before the start of the clearance, as the Home Secretary set out in Parliament. These vulnerable children, aged between 14 and 17, were transferred to the UK under the care of Home Office staff, with the support of volunteers from specialist NGOs and charities. They will join their families...

Sarah Rapson to leave Home Office

Director General of UK Visas & Immigration departs after more than 11 years at the Home Office. Sarah Rapson, Director General of UK Visas & Immigration (UKVI) at the Home Office, will be leaving the Home Office in October to take up the post of Director of Authorisations at the Financial Conduct Authority (FCA). Prior to joining UKVI as Director General in March 2014, Sarah worked in a number of high profile roles in the Home Office, including Chief Executive of the Passport Office (now HM Passport Office). Permanent Secretary Mark Sedwill said: Sarah has served the Home Office and the public with great distinction and success, and I would like to take this opportunity to thank her for her service. Under her leadership, HM Passport Office was consistently ranked as one of the top performing public sector organisations for customer service. Leading UKVI, Sarah has established a confident, able and transformed organisation. I wish her every further success in her new role. Sarah Rapson said: It’s been an honour to serve as Chief Executive of the Identity and Passport Service (IPS), Registrar General of England and Wales and the first Director General of UKVI alongside dedicated hard-working colleagues. I’m...

Visa service closures in December 2016 and January 2017

The UK Visas and Immigration biometric enrolment centres in Christchurch and Wellington will be closed from 23 December 2016 to 5 January 2017. The Auckland office will be open on 23 and 28 to 30 December 2016. All offices will be open as normal from 6 January 2017. You should allow additional time for the processing of your visa application during this period. New Zealand Post often experiences delays during December, so customers are advised to apply for their visa as early as possible at this time, but no more than 3 months before their intended arrival date in the UK. Pay your fee Follow the instructions when you apply online to pay your visa fee. If you wish to use the priority visa service, you will be required to pay an additional fee. Priority visa service You can pay an additional fee to fast track your application and have your visa application placed at the front of the processing queue. This service is available for all visa categories. Using the priority visa service is optional and does not imply or guarantee that a visa application will be successful. All visa applicants must meet the requirements of the UK Immigration...