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Medical Training Initiative

The Medical Training Initiative (MTI) is a national scheme designed to allow a small number of doctors to enter the UK from overseas for a maximum of 24 months, so that they can benefit from training and development in NHS services before returning to their home countries. Through the MTI, trainee doctors from countries outside the European Union are offered the opportunity to learn from experienced consultants within the UK national health system. From April 2017 the Department of Health, Health Education England and the Academy of Medical Royal Colleges agreed changes to the arrangements for processing applications for MTI Certificates of Sponsorship (CoS) from applicants from countries other than those identified as Department for International Development (DfID) priority countries or World Bank Low Income and Lower Middle Income Countries (LI & LMI). New applications from countries not considered DfID priority or LI&LMI countries will be placed on a revised waiting list and will be processed only if and when there is capacity at the end of each calendar month. While we do not turn away applications for doctors based in other countries, applicants from these countries and employers will need to recognise that the waiting list may become quite...

£2.3 billion boost and 1,600 jobs created as UK tech goes global

The Prime Minister will host a raft of cutting-edge companies for a roundtable, as part of London Tech Week, to showcase Britain as the best place in the world to run a tech company. This event kicks off a series of roundtables to drive inward investment in key sectors. Companies announcing investment today include: Salesforce, who are investing of $2.5 billion in the UK over the next five years, which will include the opening of a second UK data centre in 2019 Mubadala, who are launching £300 million European investment fund based in the UK NTT data who are investing £41million to open a new office and Innovation Centre, creating up to 200 jobs over the next three years The Prime Minister will in turn make a number of commitments so that tech companies will also benefit from government funding, and greater access to talent and data under new plans. These announcements will include: a new £2.5 billion British Patient Capital programme, which is expected to attract a further £5 billion in private investment, to support UK companies with high growth potential to access the long-term investment they need to grow and go global a new Start-Up Visa for entrepreneurs...

PM speech to Times CEO Summit: 26 June 2018

Introduction As business leaders, you will understand exactly what the nineteenth century American politician Daniel Webster meant when, as a young man, he was considering what career to pursue. After some thought, he decided to become a lawyer. His friends told him it was a bad idea. It was highly competitive. Most people who tried it did not succeed. Hadn’t he better choose a field in which it would be easier to find a place? No, he replied. ‘There’s always room at the top.’ Real success does not come from setting your sights low. It comes from striving to be the best. That is what British businesses have always done. You create the wealth and the jobs that provide the backbone of our economy. Your innovation and creativity are vital ingredients in our success as a nation. A Conservative government will always listen to your voice and back you every step of the way as you help grow our economy and create more good jobs. And what’s true for businesses is true for nation states in a globalised economy – to stand still is to fall behind. The United Kingdom is not standing still. In leaving the EU we are...

PM: We will deliver a farming policy which supports agriculture and improves the environment

The UK will maintain environmental protections, safeguard animal welfare and support the production of high quality food, the Prime Minister will say tomorrow as she meets farmers and food producers at the Royal Welsh Show in Llanelwedd, Powys. Theresa May will set out the government’s plans for a post-Brexit farming policy which works for farmers and food producers, while improving the environment, by replacing the EU’s Common Agricultural Policy – which awards subsidies based on the amount of land farmed – with a new system of public money for public goods. In a roundtable with farmers and agricultural organisations including the Royal Welsh Agricultural Society, Farmers Union Wales, NFU Cymru and the CLA, the Prime Minister will also reiterate her commitment to maintaining current funding levels until the end of this Parliament to ensure farmers have the certainty they need to plan for their business. Prime Minister Theresa May said: This Government is committed to supporting the half a million people who work in agriculture and growing our world leading food and drinks sector, which contributes over £100 billion to the UK economy. But we also need to protect the farmed environment for future generations. Leaving the EU presents us...

New UK aid package will “stop dirty money in its tracks” and recover millions of pounds for developing countries

A series of major new UK aid programmes will help bring criminals to justice and recover millions of pounds of illegal assets in developing countries, International Development Secretary Penny Mordaunt has announced. Illicit finance sees “dirty money” diverted away from people in poor countries to individuals involved in crime, terrorism and fraud. This not only harms economies and legitimate financial sectors, but also erodes the confidence of potential investors. The package, announced as Prime Minister Theresa May visits Kenya, will: create new centres of British expertise in major financials hubs to tackle financial crime more effectively; strengthen efforts in southern and eastern Africa to recover illegal money flows from crime, fraud and corruption through the courts; support Kenyan authorities to bring people committing financial crimes to justice by helping to identify proceeds of crime and seizing criminal property; train and mentor law enforcements officials in southern and eastern Africa to improve criminal justice systems by tightening legislation and strengthen investigation techniques, which will help to build their capacity to clamp down on serious organised crime, ranging from drugs and people trafficking to rhino and elephant poaching; and make use of British asset recovery experts by connecting them with counterparts across...

Historical background information on nationality

Historical background information on nationality British nationality remains one of the most complex part of British law, due to changes in the Nationality Law's as well as countries gaining their independence. The history of British nationality law falls into 4 periods, which are marked by key pieces of legislation: before 1915; between 1915 and 1948; between 1949 and 1983; after 1983. The 1948 Act, which came into force on 1 January 1949, introduced the status of citizen of the UK and Colonies (CUKC) whilst retaining the term British subject to cover every citizen of a Commonwealth country, including the UK and the Colonies. Between 1947 and 1951, the 9 Commonwealth countries which became independent (for nationality purposes) on 1 January 1949 introduced their own citizenship laws. The dates of the citizenship laws were as follows: Australia - 26 January 1949. Canada - 1 January 1947. Ceylon - 1 January 1949. India - 26 January 1950. Newfoundland - 31 March 1949. New Zealand - 1 January 1949. Pakistan - 13 April 1951. South Africa - 2 September 1949. Southern Rhodesia - 1 January 1950. UK - 1 January 1949. Persons closely connected with the UK or existing British territories remained British...

Baigazieva v Secretary of State for the Home Department [2018] EWCA Civ 1088

Neutral Citation Number: [2018] EWCA Civ 1088 Case No: C9/2017/3535 IN THE COURT OF APPEAL (CIVIL DIVISION) ON APPEAL FROM THE UPPER TRIBUNAL (IMMIGRATION AND ASYLUM CHAMBER) The Royal Courts of Justice Strand, London, WC2A 2LL Friday, 20 April 2018 Before: LORD JUSTICE SINGH - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - Between: BAIGAZIEVA Appellant - and – SECRETARY OF STATE FOR THE HOME DEPARTMENT Respondent - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - (DAR Transcript of WordWave International Ltd trading as DTI 8th Floor, 165 Fleet Street, London EC4A 2DY Tel No: 020 7404 1400 Fax No: 020 704 1424 Web: www.DTIGlobal.com Email: TTP@dtiglobal.eu (Official Shorthand Writers to the Court) - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - The Appellant did not appear and was not represented The Respondent did not appear and was not represented - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - Judgment (Approved) LORD JUSTICE SINGH: 1.     Introduction Because of the relatively...

SS (Nepal) v Entry Clearance Officer [2013] EWCA Civ 1206

Case No.: C5/2012/2370 Neutral Citation Number: [2013] EWCA Civ 1206 IN THE COURT OF APPEAL (CIVIL DIVISION) Date of Hearing: 25/07/2013 Date of Ruling: 25/07/2013 Before: LORD JUSTICE MOORE-BICKLORD JUSTICE ELIASLORD JUSTICE LEWISON Between: SS (NEPAL) Appellant - and - ENTRY CLEARANCE OFFICER Respondent Judgment - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - (DAR Transcript of WordWave International Limited A Merrill Communications Company 165 Fleet Street, London EC4A 2DY Tel No: 020 7404 1400 Fax No: 020 7831 8838 Official Shorthand Writers to the Court) - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - Mr Zane Malik and Mr Nazir Ahmed (instructed by Messrs Ash Norton) appeared on behalf of the Appellant. Mr Andrew Sharland (instructed by Treasury Solicitors) appeared on behalf of the Respondent. - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - Lord Justice Elias: 1.     The appellant, a citizen of Nepal, was born on 31 July 1994. He is the son of a Ms Pardhan(inaudible) who has a residence permit(inaudible) as a domestic worker allowing herhim to...

Home Secretary says paragraph 322(5) refusals of highly skilled migrants have been put on hold pending review findings

In a letter to the Home Affairs Committee, the Home Secretary has said that applications for indefinite leave to remain (ILR) by highly skilled migrants that could face refusal under paragraph 322(5) of the Immigration Rules have been put on hold pending the findings of a Home Office review. For background on the controversy over highly skilled migrants being refused under paragraph 322(5) for minor and non-criminal tax discrepancies, see our earlier article here from last week. The Home Secretary, Sajid Javid, wrote a letter to the Home Affairs Committee Chair, Yvette Cooper, on Friday and gave the following further details on the matter: "As you are aware, I have asked the Immigration Minister to conduct a review of the cohort of cases who arrived under the Tier 1 General route and were refused due to discrepancies with their HMRC records. I expect the review of the initial cohort of applications identified to be completed by the end of May after which I will report back to the Committee "I can confirm that all applications potentially falling for refusal under the character and conduct provisions of paragraph 322(5) in the Tier 1 (General) ILR and 10-year Long Residency routes, where...

Supreme Court ruling on power to impose immigration bail conditions

Immigration bail is a complex matter in Immigration Law. Supreme Court judgement in B (Algeria) (Respondent) v Secretary of State for the Home Department (Appellant) [2018] UKSC 5 is a major new ruling on powers to restrict the liberty and freedoms of those who cannot lawfully be detained. The policy that sets out "immigration bail" including the power of arrest and re-detention of persons on bail under paragraphs 22 and 29 of Schedule 2 is provided for under paragraph 24 of Schedule 2 to the 1971 Act which provides: "24. - (1) An immigration officer or constable may arrest without warrant a person who has been released by virtue of paragraph 22 above - (a) if he has reasonable grounds for believing that that person is likely to break the condition of his recognizance or bail bond that he will appear at the time and place required or to break any other condition of it, or has reasonable ground to suspect that that person is breaking or has broken any such other condition; or (b) if, a recognizance with sureties having been taken, he is notified in writing by any surety of the surety's belief that that person is likely to break...