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Assessing sufficient resources under EU rules

The Immigration (European Economic Area) Regulations 2006 (‘the Regulations’) state that a European Economic Area (EEA) national self-sufficient person or student and their family members must have sufficient resources available so they do not to become a burden on the social assistance system of the UK. When deciding if an EEA national and their family members have sufficient resources you must first check if they exceed the maximum level of resources which a British citizen and their family members can have before they no longer qualify for social assistance under the UK benefit system. If they do exceed the maximum level then you must accept that they have sufficient resources. Call ICS Legal on 0207 237 3388 or e-mail us your enquiry to info@icslegal.com

Robert Goodwill named as new Minister of State for immigration

Robert Goodwill MP was yesterday night named as the new Minister of State for immigration in the Home Office. He succeeds James Brokenshire, who has been appointed as the Northern Ireland secretary. Goodwill is a farmer by trade and has been the Member of Parliament for Scarborough and Whitby since 2005. He had previously been a Member of the European Parliament. He describes himself as a "staunch Eurosceptic", but backed Remain in the EU referendum saying Britain is stronger, safer and better off in Europe and that leaving was fraught with risk. You can read a short piece with Goodwill's views on immigration on his website here. In the March 2015 article, he backed the Government crack down on illegal immigration and the aim to reduce net migration. "As part of our successful long-term economic plan, we are building an efficient and effective immigration system that puts Britain first by clamping down on abuses of the system, making sure the right people are coming here for the right reasons and ensuring the British people get a fair deal," he wrote. In an article from January on Holocaust Memorial Day here, Goodwill encouraged all constituents to mark the day and to "join...

Breach of conditions

Ochiemhen (AP), Re Judicial Review [2016] CSOH 20  OUTER HOUSE, COURT OF SESSION [2016] CSOH 20 P1175/15 NOTE OF LADY WOLFFE In respect of the application for permission under Rule of Court 58.7 In the Petition of JOSEPH ODION OCHIEMHEN, (Assisted Person) FE, currently detained at Dungavel Immigration Detention Centre, Strathaven ML10 6RF Petitioner: for Judicial Review of a decision of the Secretary of State for the Home Department to curtail the petitioner's leave to remain in the United Kingdom Petitioner: Caskie; Drummond Miller LLP Respondent: Pirie; Office of the Advocate General 29 January 2016 Introduction [1] The petitioner is a citizen of Nigeria who was granted leave to remain in the UK subject to certain conditions. The decision challenged by this petition for judicial review was that of the Secretary of State for the Home Department to curtail that leave on the basis that the petitioner had acted in breach of one of those conditions. [2] This is one of the first applications for permission to proceed with a petition for judicial review under the new Rules in Chapter 58 of the Rules of the Court of Session ("the Rules"). I put the matter out for an oral hearing...

David Cameron’s departing words as Prime Minister

David Cameron made a statement in Downing Street on his departure as Prime Minister. When I first stood here in Downing Street on that evening in May 2010, I said we would confront our problems as a country and lead people through difficult decisions, so that together we could reach better times. It has not been an easy journey, and of course we have not got every decision right, but I do believe that today our country is much stronger. Above all it was about turning around the economy. And with the deficit cut by two-thirds, two and a half million more people in work and one million more businesses, there can be no doubt that our economy is immeasurably stronger. Politicians like to talk about policies, but in the end it is about people’s lives. I think of the people doing jobs who were previously unemployed. I think of the businesses that were just ideas in someone’s head and that today are making a go of it and providing people with livelihoods. I think of the hard-working families paying lower taxes and getting higher wages because of the first ever National Living Wage. I think of the children who...

PM meeting with USA, France, Germany and Italy: 9 July 2016

PM attended a meeting with the leaders of the United States of America, France, Germany and Italy at the end of the NATO Summit in Warsaw. A Downing Street spokesperson said: The Prime Minister attended a Quint meeting with the leaders of the United States of America, France, Germany and Italy at the end of the NATO summit in Warsaw today. They reviewed the progress made since leaders had last met in this format in Hanover in April, where the discussion had focussed on counter-terrorism, Syria, Iraq, migration and Russia/Ukraine. They were joined by President Poroshenko for a discussion on the situation in Ukraine, with leaders agreeing on the importance of injecting fresh momentum into implementation of the Minsk Agreement. Leaders also discussed Syria and Daesh, focussing on the need for all sides to abide by the Cessation of Hostilities to create the right conditions for peace negotiations to restart.

Statement: the status of EU nationals in the UK

There has been no change to the rights and status of EU nationals in the UK, and UK nationals in the EU, as a result of the referendum. The decision about when to trigger Article 50 and start the formal process of leaving the EU will be for the new Prime Minister. The UK remains a member of the EU throughout this process, and until Article 50 negotiations have concluded. When we do leave the EU, we fully expect that the legal status of EU nationals living in the UK, and that of UK nationals in EU member states, will be properly protected. The government recognises and values the important contribution made by EU and other non-UK citizens who work, study and live in the UK. I have lived in the UK for more than 5 years. What does the vote to leave the EU mean for me? EU nationals who have lived continuously and lawfully in the UK for at least 5 years automatically have a permanent right to reside. This means that they have a right to live in the UK permanently, in accordance with EU law. There is no requirement to register for documentation to confirm this...